Difference between revisions of "Krita/Manual/Blendingmodes"

Jump to: navigation, search
(HSL)
(HSV)
Line 135: Line 135:
 
This takes the Value of the colours on the lower layer, and combines them with the Saturation and Hue of the upper pixels.
 
This takes the Value of the colours on the lower layer, and combines them with the Saturation and Hue of the upper pixels.
 
===Decrease Value===
 
===Decrease Value===
 
+
See Decrease Intensity, replace Intensity with Value.
 
===Decrease Saturation HSV===
 
===Decrease Saturation HSV===
 +
See Decrease Saturation HSI, alsmost identical, except Saturation HSI and Saturation HSV are weighted differently.
 
===Hue HSV===
 
===Hue HSV===
 +
Takes the Saturation and Value of the lower layer, and outputs them with the Hue of the upper layer.
 
===Increase Value===
 
===Increase Value===
  

Revision as of 13:58, 14 June 2014

Contents

Blending Modes

Blending modes are a little difficult to explain. Basically, when one layer is above the other, the computer uses a bit of programming to decide how the combination of both layers will look.

Blending modes can not just apply to Layers, but also to individual strokes.

Favorites

These are the blending modes that have been ticked as favorites, defaulting these are:

  • Addition
  • Burn
  • Color
  • Color Dodge
  • Darken
  • Erase
  • Lighten
  • Luminosity
  • Multiply
  • Normal
  • Overlay
  • Saturation

Arithmetic

These blending modes are based on simple maths.

Addition

Adds the numerical values of two colours together:

Yellow(1,1,0)+Blue(0,0,1)=White(1,1,1)

Red(1,0,0)+Grey(0.5,0.5,0.5)=Pink(1,0.5,0.5)

Divide

Divides the numerical value from the lower color by the upper color.


Inverse Substract

This inverts the lower layer before substracting it from the upper layer.

Multiply

Multiplies the two colors with each other, but does not go beyond the upper limit.

This is often used to color in a black and white lineart. One puts the black and white lineart on top, and sets the layer to 'Multiply', and then draw in color on a layer beneath. Multiply will all the colour to go through.

White(1,1,1)xWhite(1,1,1)=White(1,1,1) White(1,1,1)xGrey(0.5,0.5,0.5)=Grey(0.5,0.5,0.5) Grey(0.5,0.5,0.5)xGrey(0.5,0.5,0.5)=Dark grey(0.25,0.25,0.25)

Substract

Substracts the top layer from the bottom layer.


EX:

White(1,1,1)-White(1,1,1)=Black(0,0,0)

White(1,1,1)-Grey(0.5,0.5,0.5)=Grey(0.5,0.5,0.5)

Grey(0.5,0.5,0.5)-Grey(0.5,0.5,0.5)=Black(0,0,0)

Darken

Burn

A variation on Divide, sometimes called 'Color Burn' in some programs.

This inverts the bottom layer, then divides it by the top layer, and inverts the result. This results in a darkened effect that takes the colors of the lower layer into account, similar to the burn technique used in traditional darkroom photography.

Darken

With the darken, the upper layer's colors are checked for their lightness. Only if they are darker than the underlying color on the lower layer, will they be visible.

Gamma Dark

Divides 1 by the lower layer, and calculates the end result using that as the power of the upper layer.

Linear Burn

Similar to Addition.

Adds the values of the two layers together and then inverts them.

HSI

HSI is a color coordinate system, using Hue, Saturation and Intensity to catagorise a color. Hue is roughly the wavelength, whether the colour is red, yellow, green, cyan, blue or purple. It is measure in 360°, with 0 being red. Saturation is the measurement of how close a color is to grey. Intensity, in this case is the tone of the color. What makes intensity special is that it recognises Yellow(rgb:1,1,0) having a higher combined rgb value than blue(rgb:0,0,1). This is a non-linear tone dimension, which means it's gamma-corrected.

Color HSI

This takes the Intensity of the colours on the lower layer, and combines them with the Saturation and Hue of the upper pixels.

Decrease Intensity

Similar to darken, but specific to intensity. Checks whether the upper layer's pixel has a lower intensity than the lower layer's pixel. If so, the intensity is decreased, if not, the lower layer's value is maintained.

Decrease Saturation HSI

Similar to darken, but specific to HSI Saturation. Checks whether the upper layer's pixel has a lower Saturation than the lower layer's pixel. If so, the Saturation is decreased, if not, the lower layer's Saturation is maintained.

Hue HSI

Takes the saturation and intensity of the lower layer and combines them with the hue of the upper-layer.

Increase Intensity

Similar to lighten, but specific to intensity. Checks whether the upper layer's pixel has a higher intensity than the lower layer's pixel. If so, the intensity is increased, if not, the lower layer's intensity is maintained.

Increase Saturation HSI

Similar to lighten, but specific to HSI Saturation. Checks whether the upper layer's pixel has a higher Saturation than the lower layer's pixel. If so, the Saturation is increased, if not, the lower layer's Saturation is maintained.

Intensity

Takes the Hue and Saturation of the Lower layer and outputs them with the intensity of the upper layer.

Saturation HSI

Takes the Intensity and Hue of the lower layer, and outputs them with the HSI saturation of the upper layer.

HSL

HSL is also a color coordinate system. It describes colors in Hue, Saturation and Lightness. Lightness specifically puts both yellow(rgb:1,1,0), blue(rgb:0,0,1) and middle grey(rgb:0.5,0.5,0.5) at the same lightness(0.5).

Color HSL

This takes the Lightness of the colours on the lower layer, and combines them with the Saturation and Hue of the upper pixels.

Decrease Lightness

See Decrease Intensity, replace Intensity with Lightness

Decrease Saturation HSL

See Decrease Saturation HSI, virtually the same except Saturation HSL is weighted differently to Saturation HSI

Hue HSL

Takes the Lightness and Saturation of the lower layer and outputs them with the Hue of the upperlayer.

Increase Lightness

See Increase Intensity, replace Intensity with Lightness

Increase Saturation HSL

See Increase Saturation HSI, virtually the same except Saturation HSL is weighted differently to Saturation HSI

Lightness

Takes the Hue and Saturation of the Lower layer and outputs them with the Lightness of the upper layer.

Saturation HSL

See Saturation HSI, virtually the same except Saturation HSL is weighted differently to Saturation HSI

HSV

HSV, occasionally called HSB, is a color coordinate system. It measures colors in Hue, Saturation, and Value(also called Brightness). Value or Brightness specifically reffers to strength at which the pixel-lights on your monitor have to shine. It sets Yellow(rgb:1,1,0), Blue(rgb:0,0,1) and White(rgb:1,1,0) at the same Value(100%)

Color HSV

This takes the Value of the colours on the lower layer, and combines them with the Saturation and Hue of the upper pixels.

Decrease Value

See Decrease Intensity, replace Intensity with Value.

Decrease Saturation HSV

See Decrease Saturation HSI, alsmost identical, except Saturation HSI and Saturation HSV are weighted differently.

Hue HSV

Takes the Saturation and Value of the lower layer, and outputs them with the Hue of the upper layer.

Increase Value

Increase Saturation HSV

Value

Takes the Hue and Saturation of the Lower layer and outputs them with the value of the upper layer.

Saturation HSV

HSY

HSY is a color coordinate system. It catagorises colors in Hue, Saturation and Luminosity. Luminosity is based on scientific studies of how much light a color reflects in real-life. Unlike the others it's linear, and while like intensity it acknowledges that Yellow(rgb:1,1,0) is light than blue(rgb:0,0,1), it also acknowledges that Yellow(rgb:1,1,0) is bright than Cyan(rgb(0,0,1), based on these studies.

Color HSY

This takes the Luminosity of the colours on the lower layer, and combines them with the Saturation and Hue of the upper pixels.

Decrease Luminosity

Decrease Saturation HSY

Hue HSY

Increase Luminosity

Increase Saturation HSY

Luminosity

Takes the Hue and Saturation of the Lower layer and outputs them with the Luminosity of the upper layer.

The most preferred one of the four Tone blending modes, as this one gives fairly intuitive results for the Tone of a hue.

Saturation HSY

Lighten

Blending modes that lighten the image.

Color Dodge

Similar to Divide. Inverts the top layer, and divides the lower layer by the inverted top layer. This results in a image with emphasized highlights, like Dodging would do in traditional darkroom photography.

Gamma Light

Hard Light

Similar to Overlay. A combination of the Multiply and Screen blending modes, switching between both at a middle-lightness.

Hard light checks if the colour on the upperlayer has a lightness above 0.5. Unlike overlay, if the pixel is lighter than 0.5,it is blended like in Multiply mode, if not the pixel is blended like in Screen mode.

Effectively, this decreases contrast.

Lighten

With the darken, the upper layer's colors are checked for their lightness. Only if they are Lighter than the underlying color on the lower layer, will they be visible.

Linear Dodge

Exactly the same as Addition.

Put in for compatibility purposes.

Linear Light

Similar to overlay.

Combines Linear Dodge and Linear Burn. When the lightness of the upper-pixel is higher than 0.5, it uses Linear dodge, if not, Linear burn to blend the pixels.

Pin Light

Screen

Perceptually the opposite of Multiply.

Mathematically, Screen takes both layers, inverts them, then multiplies them, and finally inverts them again.

This results in light tones being more opaque and dark tones transparent.

Soft Light(Photoshop) & Soft Light SVG

These are less harsh versions of Hard Light, not resulting in full black or full white.

The SVG version is slightly different to the photoshop version in that it uses a slightly different bit of formula when the lightness of the lower pixel is lower than 25%, this prevents the strength of the brightness increase.

Soft Light (svg)

Vivid Light

Similar to Overlay.

Mixes both Color Dodge and Burn blending modes. If the color of the upper layer is darker than 50%, the blending mode will be Burn, if not the blending mode will be Color Dodge.

Warning.png
 
Warning
This algorithm doesn't use color dodge and burn, we don't know WHAT it does do but for Color Dodge and Burn you need to use Hard Mix


Misc

Bumpmap

Copy

Copy Red

Copy Green

Copy Blue

Dissolve

Mix

Allanon

Blends the upper layer as half-transparent with the lower. (It add the two layers together hand then halved the value)

Alpha Darken

As far as I can tell this seems to premultiply the alpha, as is common in some file-formats.

Behind

Does the opposite of normal, and tries to have the upper layer rendered below the lower layer.

Erase

This substracts the opaque pixels of the upper layer from the lower layer, effectively erasing.

Geometric Mean

This blending mode multiplies the top layer with the bottom, and then outputs the square root of that.

Grain Extract

Similar to substract, the colors of the upper layer are substracted from the colors of the lower layer, and then 50% grey is added.

Grain Merge

Similar to addition, the colors of the upper layer are added to the colors, and then 50% grey is substracted.

Hard Mix

Similar to Overlay.

Mixes both Color Dodge and Burn blending modes. If the color of the upper layer is darker than 50%, the blending mode will be Burn, if not the blending mode will be Color Dodge.

Normal

As you may have guessed this is the default Blending mode for all layers.

In this mode, the computer checks on the upper layer how transparent a pixel is, which colour it is, and then mixes the colour of the upper layer with the lower layer proportional to the transparency.

Overlay

A combination of the Multiply and Screen blending modes, switching between both at a middle-lightness.

Overlay checks if the colour on the upperlayer has a lightness above 0.5. If so, the pixel is blended like in Screen mode, if not the pixel is blended like in Multiply mode.

This is useful for deepening shadows and highlights.

Parallel

This one first takes the percentage in two decimal behind the comma for both layers. It then adds the two values. Divides 2 by the sum. Checks if it's higher than 0. Then checks if it's lower that 100%, if not 100% is output.

Negative

These are all blending modes which seem to make the image go negative.

Additive Substractive

Arcus Tangent

Difference

Equivelance

Exclusion


Content is available under Creative Commons License SA 4.0 unless otherwise noted.